Forecasting Patchy Skies: Sew-on Naval Aviation Heraldry


Counterclockwise from top left: VF-51 Screaming Eagles as the unit was being deactivated; VF-41 sporting the Tomcat character (for the F-14 Tomcat aircraft); HC-11, Detachment 5′s WestPac cruise patch; HC-11 squadron patch.

Counterclockwise from top left: VF-51 Screaming Eagles as the unit was being deactivated; VF-41 sporting the Tomcat character (for the F-14 Tomcat aircraft); HC-11, Detachment 5′s WestPac cruise patch; HC-11 squadron patch.

Since I began this blog, I’ve covered various aspects of military-patch collecting. From shoulder sleeve insignia (SSI) to rank and rating badges, this area of collecting has something for every level of collecting, from the beginner with a scant budget to the experienced one who collects each and every obscure variation of his or her favorites.

This authentic VMF-214 squadron patch dates from WWII and is most-likely Australian-made. This “Blacksheep” patch is affixed to the G-1 flight jacket that belonged to the Marine pilot, Fred Losch.

This authentic VMF-214 squadron patch dates from WWII and is most-likely Australian-made. This “Blacksheep” patch is affixed to the G-1 flight jacket that belonged to the Marine pilot, Fred Losch.

One of my personal favorites in collecting patches, even though the size of my collection disagrees, is naval aviation squadrons (including the U.S. Marine Corps) due to the colorful (pun intended) embellishments and symbolism representing each squadron. These patches represent a lengthy history in heraldry and the history of navy flight dating back almost to its very beginning.

The tradition and history of these patches and insignia is acknowledged by U.S. Navy leadership in the Chief of Naval Operations Instructions (OPNAVINST) 5030.4G, as it states:

“The practice fosters a sense of pride, unit cohesion and contributes to high morale, esprit de corps and professionalism within the Naval Aviation community.  It also serves as an effective means of preserving a command’s tradition, continuity of purpose and recognition, as traced through its lineage.”

As early as the 1920s, United States naval aviators have employed visual graphics and heraldry complete with symbolism and characterizations of traits, behaviors and/or projections of the personality of their individual squadron commands. Often portraying ferocity or satire, these emblems would be displayed within the confines of the squadron office or the personnel’s common areas to encourage unity within the ranks.

Aviation units are quite diverse across four distinct areas: attack, fighter, patrol and helicopter squadrons. Within these areas are a myriad of functional (active) and decommissioned squadrons with a host of designs. Depending upon the length and breadth of an individual squadron’s service, there could exist dozens of designs and subsequent patch variations. As noted noted within these documents, squadron service history and lineage is incredibly detailed and expansive (histories for fighter and helicopter squadrons are in the works):

As a result of the diversity across the lineages, patch collectors can specialize in very specific areas (such as collecting all Vietnam-era fighter squadrons) or focus on a central design aspect (i.e. any squadron that incorporates an eagle into their design). For me, I look for those squadrons that I had direct contact with during my naval deployments, which include attack, fighter and helicopter squadrons, in the 1980s.

These patches represent two squadrons – one a USMC electronic warfare squadron and the other, an anti-submarine warfare helicopter squadron. Both bear the same nickname of “Seahawks.” The bottom two patches’ design was incorporated into the Marine Tactical Electronic Warfare Squadron (#4) when it was based at NAS Whibey Island in Washington State. The Seahawks (squadron) adopted the imagery from the Seahawks (the local NFL team). Since relocating to Marine Corps Air Station Cherry Point, VMAQ-4 departed from the NFL-based design,

These patches represent two squadrons – one a USMC electronic warfare squadron and the other, an anti-submarine warfare helicopter squadron. Both bear the same nickname of “Seahawks.” The bottom two patches’ design was incorporated into the Marine Tactical Electronic Warfare Squadron (#4) when it was based at NAS Whibey Island in Washington State. The Seahawks (squadron) adopted the imagery from the Seahawks (the local NFL team). Since relocating to Marine Corps Air Station Cherry Point, VMAQ-4 departed from the NFL-based design,

*See related posts:

Advertisements

About VetCollector

I have been blogging about Militaria since 2010 when I was hired to write for the A&E/History Channel-funded Collectors Quest (CQ) site. It was strange for me to have been asked as I was not, by any means, an expert on militaria nor had I ever written on a recurring basis beyond my scholastic newspaper experience (many MANY decades ago). After nearly two years, CQ was shut down and I discovered that I was enjoying the work and I had learned a lot about my subject matter over that period of time. I served for a decade in the U.S. Navy and descend from a long line of veterans who helped to forge this nation from its infancy all the way through all of the major conflicts to present day and have done so in every branch of the armed forces (except the USMC). I began to take an interest in militaria when I inherited uniforms, uniform items, decorations from my relatives. I also inherited some militaria of the vanquished of WWII that my relatives brought home, furthering my interest. Before my love of militaria, I was interested in baseball history. Beyond vintage baseball cards (early 1970s and back) and some assorted game-used items and autographs, I had a nominal collecting focus until I connected my militaria collecting with baseball. Since then, I have been selectively growing in each area and these two blogs are the result, Chevrons and Diamonds (https://chevronsanddiamonds.wordpress.com/) The Veterans Collection (https://veteranscollection.org/)

Posted on February 9, 2017, in Insignia and Devices, Shoulder Sleeve Insignia and Patches and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 8 Comments.

  1. Robert Sawyers

    Was 1 of the First at HSL-41, Night check supervisor for the flight line.1983.
    Looking for a few patches.
    Can you please help?

    Robert Sawyers

    https://polldaddy.com/js/rating/rating.js

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: