The Bizarre and the Oddities of Militaria


While there are certainly traditional military items that folks collect such as uniform items and weapons, some people aren’t satisfied with the status quo of militaria collecting. It takes a person with a bit of a twisted perspective to seek out the strange or odd items or to possess the ability to see the contextual vantage point of the militaria collector.

At first glance, Sgt. Gustave Blaither's Spanish American War Uniform Group (located at the Indiana Military Museum) seems to be a normal SpanAm War group display

At first glance, Sgt. Gustave Blaither’s Spanish American War Uniform Group (located at the Indiana Military Museum) seems to be a normal SpanAm War group display

Suppose that there are collectors who focus on field surgeon equipment from the Civil War era. A collection might include medicines and physician’s guides, but it could also include surgical implements. Aside from the traditional scalpel set, expect to see an array of macabre bone saws and tourniquets.

Another example of what some folks might deem as odd militaria could be a collection of named (meaning, engraved with the veteran’s name) Purple Heart medals awarded to service members who were killed in action (KIA). While this may also seem dark, most collectors of Purple Hearts (at least that I’ve encountered) see this as a way to preserve history and share the story of those who made the ultimate sacrifice for our nation. Whenever I glimpse one of these medals, I am overwhelmed when I consider the price that was paid by an American.

One of the most bizarre items of militaria that I have personally seen was at the Indiana Military Museum located in Vincennes, Indiana. Among the wonderful displays is a group of items that belonged to soldier who served during the 1898 war with Spain.

It seems that he suffered a debilitating head wound when some stored ammunition exploded, emitting a destructive array of metal and wood debris. The result of the wounds sustained by Sergeant Gustave Baither was the traumatic loss of one of his eyes.

Closer inspection of Blaither's collection yields this odd gem - his glass eye.

Closer inspection of Blaither’s collection yields this odd gem – his glass eye.

In my own collection, I have preserved an item that to the untrained eye would be indistinguishable as something pertaining to military use. However, this piece is a part of naval and seafarer tradition spanning centuries of sea-going service. Hand-made from a section of 1-1/2-inch fire hose, a piece of a broom handle, electrical heat-shrink tape and wrapped with braided shotline (used during Underway Replenishment), the shillelagh is a centerpiece of the equator crossing initiation ceremony known as Wog Day.

This "Wog Dog Correction Tool, also known as a "Shillelagh, " was made and used aboard the USS Camden (AOE-2) during the 1989 WestPac deployment.

This “Wog Dog Correction Tool”, also known as a “Shillelagh, ” was made and used aboard the USS Camden (AOE-2) during the 1989 WestPac deployment.

My shillelagh, made during my last sea deployment in 1989, was used to provide much-needed correction to the pollywogs (those who hadn’t crossed the equator) by applying gentle (ok… maybe not-so-gentle) swats to their posterior region as they crawl across the ship’s decks. Upon completion of that cruise, my shillelagh was tossed into my closet where it has remained, almost forgotten… that is until my kids wanted to learn about Navy traditions.

What unusual items are in your collections?

 

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Posted on June 9, 2016, in Military Folk Art, Other Militaria, Spanish American War, US Navy and tagged , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 3 Comments.

  1. I have come across a copy of Poe’s Murders in the Rue Morgue published 1898 with an inscription to Edward Pryor Ridgway from Walter Grove Commemorating the destruction of the U.S.S. battleship Maine written on Feb 1899 the one year anniversary. If this has any value let me know. The book itself I believe is rare being from the American Publishers Corp Linwood Edition (1897-1898)

    • Mere mentions of the tragedy may have some value to a Maine collector or if the names inscribed have connection to the ship (research is needed). Attempting to place a monetary value is difficult due to the item’s uniqueness. Most likely, the inscription is innocuous and bearing only a historical reference rather than being a piece of the history, itself.

  1. Pingback: A Bullet with No Name | The Veteran's Collection

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