Patrolling for Patches: Seeking the Hard-to-Find Embroidery


People start collecting military patches for a number of reasons. Considering that all branches of the United States armed forces use embroidered emblems for a multitude of purposes ranging from markings of rank and rating to unit and squadron insignia, invariably, there is something worthwhile to catapult even the non-militaria collector into pursuing the colorful cacophony of patch collecting.

My own participation in collecting patches originates with my own service in the navy. What began back in those days as an effort to adorn my utility and leather flight jackets with colorful representations of my ship and significant milestones (such as deployments) morphed into a quest to complete a shadow box that would properly represent my career in the service. Many of the patches I acquired while on active duty never found their way into use and were subsequently stashed away. It was not until I began to piece together items from my career that my patch collecting interest was ignited.

Like many other military patch collectors, I expanded my hunt from a narrow focus to a much more broad approach. As I pursued patches for another shadow box project (for a relative’s service) I started to see “deals” on random insignia that I just couldn’t live without. It wasn’t before long that I had a burgeoning gathering of embroidered goodies from World War II ranging from those from the US Marine Corps, US Army Air Corps/Forces and other ancillary US Army corps, division and regimental unit insignia*. For the sake of preserving what little storage space I had available, I throttled down and began to narrow my approach once again.

In keeping with my interest in naval history in concert with my passion for local history (where I was born and raised), my military patch collecting went in a new direction. In the past several years, I have slowly acquiring items associated with several of the ships with Pacific Northwest connections. Aside from readily available militaria associated with the USS Washington, USS Idaho and USS Oregon (all of which have stellar legacies of service). items from the ships named for the various cities (in those states) pose much more of a challenge to locate. When it comes to collecting patches, that difficulty is exponentially increased.

USS Tacoma (PG-92)

USS Tacoma (PG-92). (Source: U.S. Navy)

Of the many ships named for locations or features within Washington State, the four ships named for the City of Tacoma leave very little for a military patch collector to find, considering that only one of the four served in the era when navy ship patches came into use. The USS Tacoma (PG-92), a patrol gunboat of the Asheville class was actually built and commissioned in her namesake city, served for 12 years in the U.S. Navy from 1969 to 1981. Though her career was relatively brief, she spent her early years operating in the Pacific and in the waters surrounding Vietnam conducting patrol and surveillance operations, earning her two battle stars for her combat service.

USS Tacoma (PG-92)

This USS Tacoma (PG-92) ship’s crest shows an American Indian and “Tahoma” (Mt. Rainier) in the background. The motto, “Klahow Ya Kopachuck” translates from the Chinook language to “greetings for travelers upon the water.”

While searching for anything related to the USS Tacoma (all ships) last year, a patch from the PG-92 showed up in an online auction that really spoke to me. It was rather expensive and there were many bidders competing for the patch, so I let it go without participating. A few months later, another copy of the patch was listed prompting me to watch for bids. With no bids after a few days, I set my snipe with the understanding that someone is going to exceed my price. One bid came in seconds before the auction closed but my snipe hit at the very last second which resulted in successful outcome for me (winning the auction). It wasn’t until it arrived that I saw the ink-stamp mark on the back. It might be a bit of a detractor, but it certainly isn’t a deal breaker for this vintage 1970s-era patch. However, the patch I received most recently gives me pause.

The second USS Tacoma patch looked fantastic when viewed online even with the staining. The flag-theme evokes memories of 1975-76 and the celebration of the bicentennial of the signing of the Declaration of Independence. On the blue canton, the “PG” encircled by the stars (there are only 10 rather than 13) refers to the hull classification of the ship. Besides the incorrect count of stars, the backing material and the construction of the embroidered edge lead me to believe that this patch was made in Asia. The staining seems as though it was added to the patch to give it some aging.

The Spirit of 92 - USS Tacoma (PG-92)

This USS Tacoma patch seems to be a recently manufactured item. I have my doubts as to it being an original mid-1970s era creation.

Another indication of (what I believe to be) the Spirit of 92 patch’s recent manufacture is that it smelled new. I opened the mailing pouch and the scent of new fabric (rather than a musty odor) wafted out which seems quite strange for an old patch.

Regardless of the veracity of the age, both patches are excellent additions to my meager collection.

*Related patch-collecting articles by this author:

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Posted on May 31, 2013, in Insignia and Devices, Shoulder Sleeve Insignia and Patches, US Navy, Warships or Vessels and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 4 Comments.

  1. Very cool what you’re doing !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! I make leather flying unit patches myself and have made many a WW2 veterans day having their old Squadron/Group patch to put on a jacket or have matted/framed for their “war room” , see my work here, http://s1334.photobucket.com/user/EMBLEMHUNTER/library/Patches
    Johnny

  2. Johnny,

    Nice to see you here. As I have stated to you on the “Forum,” I really want to get a couple of your amazing artistry for my collection. You do some fantastic work!

  3. While researching a Vietnam era Utility Jacket or Fatigue Jacket that was covered with Vietnam era patches of all sorts one of them being Spirit of 92 Patch. I have had this jacket since the early 80’s and know that it was put together in the 70’s (possibly around the Bi-centennial). This was not uncommon for patch collectors to put these together at that time, especially those that had a lot of time on their hands. Your patch may be good, but you are the best judge.

    • Mark,

      Thank you for your comments and for following my blog!

      I would love to see some photos of the patch on the jacket! My doubts regarding my Spirit patch stem from the backing and the edge. It doesn’t look or feel like any other patches that I have from that era. The staining has a simulated feel, looking almost “placed,” intentionally. I would need to see an authentic patch to compare. The first patch in this post checks all the boxes and I have seen other (authentic) examples to compare it to. I am now seeing Asian-made copies of it on eBay that are obviously poor renditions.

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